News : Article

Tuvalu moves closer to establishing rights body

Graphic: RRT and APF representatives present a copy of the draft legislation to Tuvalu's Ombudsman

Legislation to establish a national human rights institution will be presented to the parliament of Tuvalu for discussion and debate in 2017.


Legislation to establish a national human rights institution will be presented to the parliament of Tuvalu for discussion and debate in 2017.

Under the draft legislation, Tuvalu's Ombudsman would be given additional powers to promote and protect human rights in the South Pacific nation.

The Ombudsman is currently responsible for implementing the country's Leadership Code, which commits Tuvalu's leaders to the principles of good governance.

The new human rights legislation would establish a Chief Ombudsman and two Ombudsman Commissioners, one with responsibility for the Leadership Code and one with responsibility for human rights.

Tuvalu's national human rights institution would be able to receive complaints and initiate inquiries into pressing human rights issues, as well as undertake activities to promote awareness of fundamental human rights.

The legislation was drafted by Tuvalu's Office of the Ombudsman and Office of the Attorney-General, along with representatives from the Regional Rights Resource Team (Romulo Nayacalevu and Eseta Lauti).

Jenni Whelan, APF Legal and Policy Manager, also contributed to the drafting process, which took place in Tuvalu's capital, Funafuti, from 24-28 January 2017.

The legislation has been drafted to ensure that Tuvalu's national human rights institution is established in compliance with the Paris Principles, which sets out the minimum standards for independent and effective NHRIs.

Tuvalu, in the South Pacific, has a population of just over 10,000 people living across its nine, low-lying islands.

Date: 7 February 2017


Image credits

  1. RRT and APF representatives present a copy of the draft legislation to Tuvalu's Ombudsman - Regional Rights Resource Team